2013 Predictions Revisited

It’s that time a year when we pick our favorite trends from the past year and pull predictions out of a hat for the upcoming year.

Here is my list of predictions for 2013. As you can see, I’m not very good at looking into a hat for answers.

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Listen to Users

No matter what you do or where you work, you have users. These can be patients, members, providers, or vendors. It doesn’t matter if you’re B2B and sell to enterprises, you still either have users at that enterprise or that enterprise has its own users (patients and providers) for your tools. EHR vendors like Epic have enterprise customers, provider users, management users, and patient users (through Epic PHR solutions). B2C apps like the new AskMD app from Sharecare sell directly to users, in this case consumers. Even a content business like HIStalk has users — they are the readers, even those readers who aren’t on our mailing list.

Listen to Users

If you work directly with users, good for you. It’s a lot easier to get feedback and ask questions and it’s a lot easier to understand how users are actually using your service or product. You can poll users really easily. You can also respond a lot more quickly and you can be a lot more of a hero to users.

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Revisiting the Hype of Mobile Health

The mHealth Summit last week serves as a good barometer of mobile health, even though it’s having an identity crisis. I’ve been thinking about phases and stages. Where is mobile health being held up? In what stage is it stuck?

Revisiting the Hype of Mobile Health

Rick Valencia, VP/GM of Qualcomm Life, talked about waves for mobile health in his keynote at the Summit. The waves he laid out were 1) mobilize, 2) organize, 3) insight, and 4) behavior change. Those waves are in reference to the data being generated by connected health apps and devices. Those waves are perfectly logical. I think some motivated early adopters are already experiencing all of the waves. People who are independent of providers and reimbursement and all the other complexities in healthcare are quantifying themselves and using that data as a starting point to make healthier behavior.

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The Great Re-Bundling of Healthcare, Part 2

This is part 2 in a series of posts of how computers are rebuilding healthcare. Check out part 1.

Medicine is organized into disciplines. Many of these disciplines have been around for decades. The medical disciplines appear to make sense in terms of both provider training and patient service. See a cardiologist for heart problems. See a dermatologist for skin problems. See an ophthalmologist for eye problems. See an ENT for ear problems. Each of these disciplines requires years of specialized training, so matching up patients accordingly makes sense.

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mHealth Summit Identity Crisis

I was at the mHealth Summit this week. Thankfully I got in Monday morning and missed most of the travel problems on Sunday. I did wait about an hour outside for a cab at DCA and found myself wishing I’d used Uber like Mr. H did, but I don’t have Uber in my home city so it’s not top of mind for me when I’m looking for a ride.

As Mr. H wrote earlier this week, the Summit is still dealing with an identity crisis. The last time Mr. H attended in 2010, the conference was the first time we met in person, the year Bill Gates spoke, and the last year before HIMSS bought the conference. That year the focus was on global health and the big stars were doing things like SMS for community health workers in Africa, mobile virtual care to millions of rural people in India, counterfeit medication checking over SMS, or mobile adherence for TB and HIV treatment.

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