Changing the World

Why startups rarely change the world" says that Google, by building a better search algorithm to organize the world’s information, did not bring foundational change to the world. The foundational change, according to the author, was brought about by the government that funded — without concern for revenue, profits, and a potential exit — the development of a network of interconnected networks that we lovingly today call the Internet.

I don’t necessarily agree. I think technology like Google has also changed the world. So have Facebook and Twitter, to name the obvious.

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Got HIPAA?

HIPAA is pretty awesome! Well, that’s not entirely true. HIPAA has some significant drawbacks, like being interpretable and having some massive penalties for violating it. It has also developed a reputation in healthcare and even outside of healthcare.

HIPAA technically only applies to covered entities, such as providers, payers, clearinghouses, and business associates that are doing business with those covered entities. There are debates in Washington to extend HIPAA to PHR systems like Microsoft’s HealthVault, but for now those services do not consider themselves to be business associates and technically are not required to follow HIPAA.

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mHealth World Congress

I was in Boston last year for mHealth World Congress. Much of the focus was on new ideas and startups, while this year the emphasis was on the activities and lessons learned of systems, payers, and providers. The event was tiny compared to the mHealth Summit, but it felt bigger than last year.

There were a few things that hit home. These conferences, and some of the lessons learned from them, aren’t totally applicable to most players in healthcare. The presentations from organizations like Cleveland Clinic, while very impressive, are far from what most hospitals and health systems can do today (or ever will.) That’s fine because we need the early adopters that can spend money to test, fail, and share those learnings with the broader industry.

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Mobile Health Market Drivers

The health IT market and more specifically the mobile health market are growing rapidly and will continue to do so over the short to medium term at the least. Reports predict growth of the mobile health market from 40 to 60 percent. Whatever the specific numbers, the market is big and growing. I often cite 50,000 mobile health apps in the iOS App Store — a stat that is dated – and that 250,000 people downloaded a health or fitness app last year.

Mobile Health Market Drivers

I never buy research reports, but I’m happy to read summaries because they are more digestible. Research and Markets released a new mobile health report this month examining trends over the next four years. The report is over $1,200 if you want to buy the full version.

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Blueprint Health’s Summer / Fall 2013 Class

Blueprint Health, a New York City-based healthcare accelerator, announced and welcomed its next class of startups last week. The headline and message is that it is made up of more mature companies, five of which are apparently already making money.

Blueprint Health’s Summer / Fall 2013 Class

It’s a good sign for Blueprint that increasingly mature companies are entering the accelerator. That means it is attracting lower-risk investments with additional validation of the product and market, presumably at the same investment terms as earlier stage startups. Other successful accelerators, like YCombinator, are able to attract later stage startups because the thought is that good accelerators can still deliver value worth more than the seven percent equity they take.

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